Category Archives: BP at the Daily

Why you should be watching ‘Parks and Rec’ | BP at the Daily

Below is an excerpt from my review of Parks and Recreation that ran in today’s edition of the Tufts Daily. The article is the latest edition of “Second Chances,” a semi−recurring feature that looks at TV shows that deserve a second chance from viewers. Their ratings may be low, but their quality is high, so if you tuned out early on, here’s our case for why you should give each show another try.

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American Television: Not Quite the Land of Opportunity | BP at the Daily

design by Leanne Brotsky

For today’s Tufts Daily, I wrote the weekly Weekender feature, focusing on the continued lack of racial diversity on television. Although progress has been made over the past several decades, the roles available to people of color are still unrepresentative, qualitatively and quantitatively, of the population of color in the U.S.

I talked to TV critics and writers Mo Ryan (AOL), Dan Fienberg (HitFix), Josh Wolk (Vulture) and Myles McNutt (Cultural Learnings) to get their thoughts on the current TV landscape in terms of racial diversity. After the jump, I have the article intro, and you can read the full article at the Daily website here.

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‘The Killing’ review | BP at the Daily

Dreary and methodical, "The Killing" makes for killer TV.

In today’s issue of the Tufts Daily, I review The Killing, AMC’s newest drama. Slow and methodical, it’s practically the anti-procedural, but is gripping nonetheless and features some terrific performances.

Crime and murder shows are a dime a dozen these days. “CSI,” “Law & Order,” “Criminal Minds,” their multiple spin-offs — it’s safe to say that you could turn on your TV at any moment and find a team of detectives investigating the latest whodunit and trying to bring a killer to justice.

Where “The Killing,” AMC’s newest drama series, varies from those shows, though, is that the titular crime is the focus of the entire 13-episode season, not just one episode. Each week’s installment does not tie up a different case in a neat little bow. Instead, the murder is drawn out, giving the audience the chance to see how it actually affects those parties involved.

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Sitcom Survey: NBC | BP at the Daily

'Parks and Recreation' is the best comedy currently on TV.

In today’s issue of the Tufts Daily, I have my fourth and final piece in a four-part series investigating the current state of network television comedy. I’m taking a network by network approach, and today’s installment focuses on NBC.

NBC is a struggling network. It is currently in fourth place among the broadcast networks in total viewership, averaging 7.39 million viewers, and is tied for third place in adults 18-49 (the coveted advertiser demographic) with a 2.4 rating average.

The fact that NBC lacks a certifiable hit, though (aside from “The Office” and maybe “Law and Order: SVU”), has been a blessing in disguise for most of the network’s Comedy Night Done Right lineup. “Community,” “Parks and Recreation” and even multiple Emmy-winner “30 Rock” all underperform in the ratings, but since the ratings threshold is so low, their performances are acceptable and good enough to be renewed for new seasons (as all four aforementioned comedies have been).

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Sitcom Survey: ABC | BP at the Daily

‘Modern Family’ is one of ABC’s most acclaimed shows, but does it deserve all the praise?

In today’s issue of the Tufts Daily, I have my third piece in a four-part series investigating the current state of network television comedy. I’m taking a network by network approach, and today’s focus is on ABC.

CBS is home to the mass-appeal, more traditional sitcom, Fox has a stronghold on animation and NBC boasts a lineup of critically acclaimed single-camera comedies. So where does that leave ABC?

The network had somewhat of a comedy resurgence last season, when it premiered “Modern Family,” “Cougar Town” and “The Middle” all to some level of success (all three were renewed for a second season, and have since been renewed for a third as well). “Modern Family” was quickly heralded as the comeback of the family comedy and was, along with Fox’s “Glee,” the breakout hit of the 2009-10 TV season. The other two flew more under the radar, but have developed into solid hits.

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Sitcom Survey: Fox | BP at the Daily

"Bob's Burgers" is a welcome addition to the Fox Animation Domination lineup.

In today’s issue of the Tufts Daily, I have my second piece in a four-part series investigating the current state of network television comedy. I’m taking a network by network approach, and today’s focus is on Fox.

Just as CBS has become the Chuck Lorre laugh factory, Fox serves the same function for Seth MacFarlane. His three series, “Family Guy,” “American Dad!” and “The Cleveland Show,” are the bedrock of the network’s Sunday night Animation Domination lineup, and at this point often draw more viewers than Fox’s other signature animated show, “The Simpsons.”

As with CBS, though, popularity is not necessarily a measure of quality. MacFarlane’s shows have proven immensely profitable for him and for Fox, but have done so largely by appealing to the lowest common denominator, with cheap humor, gross-out gags and little-to-no character development.

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Sitcom Survey: CBS | BP at the Daily

"How I Met Your Mother" is CBS' best sitcom

In today’s issue of the Tufts Daily, I have my first piece in a four-part series investigating the current state of network television comedy. I’m taking a network by network approach, and today’s focus is on CBS.

Broadcast television runs on advertising revenue. TV networks charge higher ad rates for their more popular programs, since more people watching a particular show means more people watching the commercials during it.

More important than total viewers, though, is the adults 18−49 demographic. The rationale is that these relatively younger viewers are less likely to be set in their ways regarding brand loyalty. Advertisers are willing to pay more to reach those viewers because, to them, it is a better investment.

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