Tag Archives: Sitcom

Why you should be watching ‘Parks and Rec’ | BP at the Daily

Below is an excerpt from my review of Parks and Recreation that ran in today’s edition of the Tufts Daily. The article is the latest edition of “Second Chances,” a semi−recurring feature that looks at TV shows that deserve a second chance from viewers. Their ratings may be low, but their quality is high, so if you tuned out early on, here’s our case for why you should give each show another try.

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Sitcom Survey: ABC | BP at the Daily

‘Modern Family’ is one of ABC’s most acclaimed shows, but does it deserve all the praise?

In today’s issue of the Tufts Daily, I have my third piece in a four-part series investigating the current state of network television comedy. I’m taking a network by network approach, and today’s focus is on ABC.

CBS is home to the mass-appeal, more traditional sitcom, Fox has a stronghold on animation and NBC boasts a lineup of critically acclaimed single-camera comedies. So where does that leave ABC?

The network had somewhat of a comedy resurgence last season, when it premiered “Modern Family,” “Cougar Town” and “The Middle” all to some level of success (all three were renewed for a second season, and have since been renewed for a third as well). “Modern Family” was quickly heralded as the comeback of the family comedy and was, along with Fox’s “Glee,” the breakout hit of the 2009-10 TV season. The other two flew more under the radar, but have developed into solid hits.

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Sitcom Survey: CBS | BP at the Daily

"How I Met Your Mother" is CBS' best sitcom

In today’s issue of the Tufts Daily, I have my first piece in a four-part series investigating the current state of network television comedy. I’m taking a network by network approach, and today’s focus is on CBS.

Broadcast television runs on advertising revenue. TV networks charge higher ad rates for their more popular programs, since more people watching a particular show means more people watching the commercials during it.

More important than total viewers, though, is the adults 18−49 demographic. The rationale is that these relatively younger viewers are less likely to be set in their ways regarding brand loyalty. Advertisers are willing to pay more to reach those viewers because, to them, it is a better investment.

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